The New Living Translation
Stretch your Bible’s spine for a flexible, long-lasting binding

What’s the first thing you do with a Bible after you purchase it? Look up your favorite verse? Write your name on the first page? Hit someone over the head with it? (just kidding, please don’t do this)

If you want to make your Bible last a long time, the first thing you do once you get it home (or before you wrap it up as a gift) is to stretch out the binding.

Here’s how:

Hold the closed Bible in one hand with the spine flat on a table.  Then hold all of the pages together and let the covers slowly fall to the table.  Next, take a section of pages from the front of the Bible and lay them down, running your fingers across the top page, near the crease, pressing gently.  Still holding most of the pages upright in your hand, repeat, taking a section of pages from the back of the Bible.  Continue repeating this process, first on one side and then on the other, until the entire Bible has been opened into two even halves.

This way, the binding will be flexible and less likely to crack, lose pages, etc. I use this trick for all textbooks too–any book could benefit from it, but higher-cost, high-usage books like Bibles will benefit the most.

11 Responses to “Stretch your Bible’s spine for a flexible, long-lasting binding”
28th July, 2010 at 7:55 am

I’ve done this on most every hardback and leather-bound book I have bought over the years, and it usually works… unfortunately, my NLT Life Application Study Bible is one of only two books I can think of that it didn’t help with… I have already lost the front and back sections, and others seem to be coming loose. The only other book I have done the SpineStrech with that subsequently had problems was a hardback novel I bought about five years ago.

Laura Bartlett
30th July, 2010 at 3:23 pm

I’m sorry to hear that Robert. Were there extreme temperature conditions when you did stretched it? Life Application Study Bibles were constructed to last. Give our customer service department a call and they might be able to help you out. (1-800-323-9400)

Ed Story
31st July, 2010 at 4:57 pm

Will you be producing the NLT Application Study Bible in a slimline edition similar to the NLT Large Print (9.4 type)Premium Slimline reference (2007) any time soon?

I am looking for the NLT Application Bible in large print that has less than 3200 pages and weighs less than 4.5 lbs.

30th August, 2010 at 6:54 pm

I’ve used my NTL (c)1996 (ISBN 0-8423-8424-6)) Genuine Leather Slimline for about 8 years as my travel Bible (I travel weekly) and I love it. The binding, leather, fonts, size – everything about makes it the perfect heavy use travel Bible. It’s worn so well that it’s better now than when it was new. I’ve been searching for the (c)2007 equivalent but it’s not to be found. The new Slimlines have lowered the quality of the font and page layout, and I can’t find them in genuine leather. The NLT Select looks is the type of leather and binding I’m looking for, but the large font is clunky and it’s a bit too large for a road warrior. I bought the Cambridge NLT Pitt Minion, but returned it – the 6.75 point font was too small. There’s a market for very high quality leather and bindings in a portable Bible. Please offer a Slimline Select, or the same leather Slimline I have of the ©1996 version. And thanks for a great translation.

Barb Bourne
3rd September, 2010 at 12:28 pm

I just read Robert Lyons post regarding his New Living Translation bible falling apart. Mine had done the same thing, not long after I received it from a friend as a gift. I have kept it, but not able to travel with it cause it comes apart. I would normally just replace it, but my good friend wrote a beautiful sentiment in its cover page and the date – it’s when we became friends!!!

Any ideas?

Barb Bourne
3rd September, 2010 at 12:30 pm

Regarding an earlier post regarding his New Living Translation bible falling apart. Mine had done the same thing, not long after I received it from a friend as a gift. I have kept it, but not able to travel with it cause it comes apart. I would normally just replace it, but my good friend wrote a beautiful sentiment in its cover page and the date – it’s when we became friends!!!

Any ideas?

Gwen Stephens
22nd October, 2010 at 7:43 pm

Unfortunately, my NLT has done the same thing, and like some of the others, I haven’t been anxious about replacing it because I have personal notes and study notes that I don’t want to part with. Mine started coming apart at the map section. However, it seems the stitching is acting like perforation – almost like the stitch holes are much too large; therefore, its allowing the pages to pull free. Any suggestions? I really don’t want to give this up. It’s slim yet large enough to read, and I’m really enjoying this version.

SeanHarrison
27th October, 2010 at 10:32 am

@Paul, Tyndale is releasing a Tyndale Select genuine leather slimline in January 2011 – see http://www.amazon.com/Tyndale-Select-NLT/dp/1414349394

Gwen, Barb, and Robert: You can buy binders glue and repair the binding; sorry you should need to do that!

John F.
11th November, 2010 at 10:13 pm

I chose the blog entry.Thanks for making it available to all. John

Jon
18th December, 2011 at 2:07 am

Seriously Tyndale, someone read these posts. There is demand for a well made leather Bible. Crossway makes some very nice Bibles, give them a call and see how they do it.

Richard
10th May, 2015 at 9:13 am

My NLT slimline center reference Bible (isbn 978-1-4143-2704-4) did just what these others did. I seem to have found a reoccurring problem here and on the amazon website. The stitching at the maps allow the pages to come apart at the binding. I have had for 3 years. It has been well kept. I followed these instructions exactly. And now it is falling apart. Not so much as a scratch or crease anywhere else on the Bible.

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